Helping you find OA resources on Discover

Following our last post on adding more Open Access resources to Library Hub Discover, we’ve added records from the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ) and Jisc Historical Texts and Journal Archives (currently free to all Jisc members).

We’ve also made some changes to the sort order to bring OA and online resources to the top of your search results. You will now see OA resources first, followed by non-OA online resources, with print material last.

Where there’s an indication in the source record that the resource is OA, we’ve now added the OA symbol next to the library/resource collection name, as well as in the summary record, eg

For online resources where there is no OA symbol, you may be required to enter institutional credentials to access the material.

Many publishers are now making their online materials freely available during the COVID-19 crisis. So if you find an online book or journal it is worth trying the URL links in the record to see if you can get access. You may find that some URL links take you through a university login – so look for links that are direct to the resource eg. the first link below goes straight to the online book whilst the second will take you through an institutional login:

And if you can’t see a direct link try a web search for the publisher web site and journal name to see if you can have access. You can also contact your own university or college library service to see if they can advise regarding access to particular resources.

More library catalogues added to Discover: Foundling Museum, Newman University and University of Sunderland

We’re pleased to announce that the holdings of the Foundling Museum (Gerald Coke Handel Collection), Newman University and University of Sunderland have been added to the Discover service.

Foundling Museum – Gerald Coke Handel Collection

Foundling Museum Library

Foundling Museum Library

The collection focuses on Handel and his musical contemporaries in Britain, and comprises over 12,000 items relating to 18th century music. These include about 1,000 manuscripts, as well as printed books, music scores, libretti, performance ephemera and artworks from the 18th century to the present; the collection now acquires modern research and antiquarian material, including sound recordings.

The collection was in private hands until the 1990s, and was formally opened to the public in 2004. It is used for teaching undergraduate and postgraduate students from several universities, as well for scholarly research and performance repertoire discovery. The collection has many rare and unique items and a strong collection of ephemeral publications; items are frequently loaned for exhibitions elsewhere, and images supplied for publications and broadcasts.

Find out more about the library on their Discover information page.

Newman University

Newman University Library

Newman University Library

Newman University Library offers a range of resources to support teaching, learning, and research across the institution. The Library operates an external membership scheme and participates in SCONUL Access.

Find out more about the library on their Discover information page.

University of Sunderland

The University has campuses in Sunderland, London and Hong Kong. Special Collections are based in the Murray Library at the Sunderland campus and include:

  • Lord Putnam Collection
  • Kate Adie Collection
  • North East England Mining Archive & Research Centre (NEEMARC)
  • Sidney Pollard Collection

Find out more about the library on their Discover information page.

Explore the libraries’ collections on Discover

  • Selecting the search code to the right of each library name on the About page enables you search for all the records from an individual library.
  • To browse or limit your search to the holdings of any library, or a group of libraries, use Advanced Search to select the Libraries tab in Discover and choose the library name(s) from the list of libraries.

 

Open access resources on Library Hub Discover

Adding aggregations of Open Access (OA) resources has always been one of the aims for Discover. With the closure of most libraries across the UK due to coronavirus (COVID-19) and the requirements for people to stay at home wherever possible, we have prioritised adding these resources.

Discover now contains records from the Directory of Open Access Books (DOAB), and we will soon be adding the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ) and the Hathi Trust, with others to follow. This will include the Jisc Historical Texts and Journal Archives data, which are now free to all Jisc members until the end of July.

Material which we can identify as OA contains an OA symbol

You’ll notice that many other libraries often hold this Open Access content. However, the links from these to full-text will often be behind authentication. To ensure that you get the OA link, choose ‘Directory of Open Access Books’ and follow the links on that page.

There isn’t currently an advanced-search option for OA content, but you can search ‘open access’ as a keyword. We’re working on our relevance rankings to bring material that has been identified as Open Access to the top of the results list.

Library Hub Services and the coronavirus (COVID-19)

As you may know, in response to recent government advice Jisc offices are now closed and the Library Hub team are working from home. We are all now settling into a new routine and we don’t expect the changes to have any significant impact on the Library Hub services. However, it may be that some contributing libraries have problems transferring their data to us during this period, so updates may be affected.  Please check our libraries list to see the date of the latest updates loaded.

It may be obvious, but just a reminder that many libraries may be closed for the time being, so if you are planning any visits make sure you check with the library in advance. If you select the name of a library in our libraries list this will take you to our information page for that library. Here you will find contact details and a link to the library’s web site for more information.

Staff in Jisc member libraries may be interested in following up the information and guidance being provided by Jisc: https://www.jisc.ac.uk/coronavirus

If you have any questions please contact us through the Jisc helpdesk: help@jisc.ac.uk – stating that your query is for the Library Hub team.

With best wishes from the Library Hub team.

The Frederick Lanchester collection at Coventry University Library

The work of car manufacturer, engineer, scientist and inventor Frederick Lanchester (1868-1946) is celebrated by the Lanchester Interactive Archive (LIA) at Coventry University. He was a leading automobile engineer in the UK during the late 19th and early 20th centuries, and creator in 1895 of the first all-British four-wheel petrol driven motor car.

This work led to him building the first all-British motor boat in the 1890s and then the first outboard motor engine – because restrictive speed limits on roads meant that he could not carry out meaningful engine tests in cars.

Frederick Lanchester at the wheel of the 8 h.p. two cylinder Lanchester car known as the ‘Gold Medal Phaeton’ with his brother George as passenger, c1899 [LAN/1/16/4].

Frederick Lanchester at the wheel of the 8 h.p. two cylinder Lanchester car known as the ‘Gold Medal Phaeton’ with his brother George as passenger, c1899 [LAN/1/16/4].

He also made significant contributions in aerodynamics and powered flight, publishing work about it in the 1890s before the Wright brothers’ first successful take off in 1903. His mathematical theories on military combat and strategy formed the basis for operations models used in business, and he advised the government on military matters in the First and Second World Wars. He was a true polymath and other interests included optics and field of vision, colour photography, musical notation, pneumatic-framed buildings, radios, loudspeakers, gramophones and many other subjects.

Frederick Lanchester with one of his model gliders used to make aerodynamic measurements, 1894 [LAN/7/4].

Frederick Lanchester with one of his model gliders used to make aerodynamic measurements, 1894 [LAN/7/4].

The Lanchester Motor Company was formed in 1899 in Birmingham and Frederick Lanchester spent much of his life and career in the West Midlands. His experiments revolutionised the development of car engines. For example, his early car models had a radical new gearbox design later adopted by Henry Ford, and in 1902 the Lanchester company became the first to market disc brakes to the public. Another innovation ahead of its time was a hybrid petrol-electric car built in 1927, which is now at Birmingham Science Museum (thinktank).

The Birmingham Small Arms Company bought the Lanchester Motor Company in 1930 and made it a subsidiary of Daimler, which meant the manufacture of Lanchester cars moved to Coventry. Lanchester continued to set benchmarks in car design, and his models were favoured by royalty, including King George VI. The last Lanchester cars were produced in the mid-1950s.

In early 2016 the LIA started to digitise much of the material in the collection, which is the largest Frederick Lanchester archive in the world. The LIA exhibition space in the university library had its official launch in April 2017. The project’s first phase (funded by the National Lottery and others) ended in April 2019, but the university continues to support the LIA.

An augmented reality tablet in a car steering wheel shaped frame being used in the Lanchester Interactive Archive space at Coventry University library, 2017.

An augmented reality tablet in a car steering wheel shaped frame being used in the Lanchester Interactive Archive space at Coventry University library, 2017.

Outreach work features augmented reality (AR) and virtual reality tools, projections and pop-up displays. Individuals and groups (e.g. schools, organisations and communities) come to the LIA space, and workshops are tailored for any age group.

The LIA space has touch screens that include interactive games and puzzles to explain the engineering and technical aspects of Lanchester’s work and his inventions, and visitors can point AR tablets at the exhibition images to produce additional information on the tablets. Visitors can also sit in a car built by one of the LIA consultants (Lanchester historian and enthusiast Chris Clark).

External visits also take place, and this has been strengthened by the university’s recent purchase of a 1932 Lanchester 15/18 car. It is planned to adapt the car into an outreach vehicle for events and visits, especially during 2021 Coventry City of Culture, and a small volunteer team of Lanchester enthusiasts are helping to keep the car in working order.

Coventry University’s 1932 Lanchester car parked outside the newly refurbished library (appropriately named the Frederick Lanchester building), 2020.

Coventry University’s 1932 Lanchester car parked outside the newly refurbished library (appropriately named the Frederick Lanchester building), 2020.

Over 21,000 images will eventually be available via the university’s online archives catalogue including personal and business correspondence, sketch books, pocket note books, copies of patent applications, blueprints, copies and manuscript originals of published works and a large collection of contemporary photographs of Lanchester cars and other vehicles. The catalogue has been updated recently to include a second series of Lanchester correspondence and the blueprints will be added later this year.

Other items that have not been catalogued yet include Lanchester family papers, objects, and donations from individuals and organizations such as the Lanchester Trust, a charity that supports the university’s Lanchester collection work.

The LIA aims to open up Lanchester’s archives and show their potential for research in a variety of subjects. One Coventry student was inspired by an 1897 Lanchester aircraft patent as part of his MSc in aerospace engineering. A flight simulation model was created of the manned flying machine, which was never built at the time. Advanced computer software then proved that Lanchester’s machine would have flown, and would have been more aerodynamically stable than the Wright brothers’ machine used in the world’s first powered flight. The simulation was among several designs showcased by Coventry University students at the 2018 Farnborough International Airshow.

Illustration from the Frederick Lanchester patent for improvements in and relating to aerial machines, 1897 [LAN/6/34/10].

Illustration from the Frederick Lanchester patent for improvements in and relating to aerial machines, 1897 [LAN/6/34/10].

More information can be found on the LIA website which includes a link to Coventry University’s online archives catalogue.

Gary Collins
Archivist, Coventry University

Explore Coventry University library’s collections on Library Hub Discover:

Browse the library records here

All images copyright Coventry University (available via Creative Commons 4.0 license) and reproduced with the kind permission of the copyright holders.

Latest catalogues added to Discover: King’s College and Trinity College Libraries, University of Cambridge

We’re pleased to announce that the holdings of University of Cambridge libraries King’s College and Trinity College (Special Collections) have been added to the Discover service.

King’s College Library

King's College Library, University of Cambridge

King’s College Library, University of Cambridge

King’s College Library has been in continuous existence since the foundation of the College in 1441. As well as preserving many rare book and manuscript treasures, the Library serves the current needs of undergraduate, graduate and senior members of the College with a stock of approximately 130,000 books.

Find out more about the library on their Discover information page.

Trinity College Library (Special Collections)

Trinity College Library, University of Cambridge

Trinity College Library, University of Cambridge

Trinity College Library’s special collections include 750 incunabula, the Capell collection of Shakespeariana, many books from the library of Sir Isaac Newton including his annotated copy of the Principia Mathematica, the Rothschild collection of 18th century literature, the Kessler collection of livres d’artistes, and over 70,000 books printed before 1820.

Find out more about the library on their Discover information page.

Explore more University of Cambridge Libraries on Discover

The libraries of King’s and Trinity Colleges join other Cambridge University Libraries already available on Discover:

* Selecting the search code to the right of each library name on the About page enables you search for all the records from an individual library.

* To search King’s, Trinity and other Cambridge University libraries combined, use Advanced Search to select the Libraries tab and choose the library names from the list of libraries.

Latest library catalogues added to Discover: Eton College, National Library of Scotland and University of Coventry

We’re pleased to announce that the holdings of Eton College Library, National Library of Scotland and the University of Coventry Library have been added to the Discover service.

Eton College Library

Eton College Library

Eton College Library

Eton College Library was established in the 1440s as the library of the Provost and Fellows, who form the governing body of Eton College. Today it holds more than 150,000 items, ranging from the 9th to 21st centuries. These include nearly 200 medieval and Renaissance manuscripts; ca 26,000 printed items of the 15th-19th centuries (including 194 incunabula and the Waddington Pamphlet Collection of ca 4700 pamphlets, tracts and sermons dating from the 16th-18th centuries); the Macnaghten Library of First World War materials, presented to Eton as a memorial in 1938 (ca 5000 volumes); literary manuscripts and autograph letters; and prints and drawings. Strengths include classics, theology, English literature, art, travel, private presses, theatrical history, books on Eton and Windsor and fine bindings.

Find out more about the library on their Discover information page.

National Library of Scotland

The National Library of Scotland is a reference library with world-class collections. It is also Scotland’s largest library and one of the major research libraries in Europe. Their collections range from rare historical documents to online journals, covering every subject. They specialise in Scotland’s knowledge, history and culture.

Find out more about the library on their Discover information page.

University of Coventry

Coventry University Library

Coventry University Library

Coventry University’s library is situated in the Frederick Lanchester Building, and houses physical resources for the whole University. It is open 364 days a year, 24 hours a day – only closing for Christmas Day.

** Coming soon on our blog: feature on the University of Coventry’s collections! **

Find out more about the library on their Discover information page.

Explore their collections on Discover

  • Selecting the search code to the right of each library name on the About page enables you search for all the records from an individual library.
  • To browse or limit your search to the holdings of any library, or a group of libraries, use Advanced Search to select the Libraries tab in Discover and choose the library name(s) from the list of libraries.

Treasures of the Linnean Society of London Library

The Linnean Society of London, founded by James Edward Smith in 1788, is the world’s oldest learned society devoted to the biological sciences. It was created as a forum for scientific discussion, and as a home for the magnificent book, manuscript, and specimen collections of the Swedish naturalist and “father of taxonomy”, Carl Linnaeus. It has fulfilled both of these functions for over 230 years.

Plate 7 from Edward Lear’s Illustrations of the family of Psittacidœ, or parrots. Macrocercus aracanga (red and yellow Maccaw). London: E. Lear, 1832.

Plate 7 from Edward Lear’s Illustrations of the family of Psittacidœ, or parrots. Macrocercus aracanga (red and yellow Maccaw). London: E. Lear, 1832.

Linnaeus’ collections came to London by a rather circuitous route. They were originally left to Linnaeus’ son (also called Carl, also a naturalist), but Carl Filius died young, and with four other children to provide for, Linnaeus’s widow Sara Lisa was forced to sell. She approached the buccaneering explorer and scientific patron Joseph Banks, who recommended a sale to Smith, then a promising botanist recently graduated from the University of Edinburgh. Smith snapped up the huge collection of books, manuscripts, and nearly 14,000 specimens for the bargain price of £1,000 (around £76,000 in today’s money). They are now housed in a purpose-built, bombproof vault beneath the teeming shoppers of Piccadilly.

Perhaps the most famous event in the Society’s history occurred on July 1st, 1858, when two papers were presented to a meeting of the Fellowship. “Extract from a book on the production of varieties” and “On the tendency of varieties to depart from the type” may not sound especially gripping, but they represent the first public presentation of the theory of evolution by natural selection by Charles Darwin and Alfred Russel Wallace. Embarrassingly, the Society’s President at the time failed to recognise the importance of the event, and his end of year oration lamented the lack of any “striking discoveries which at once revolutionize the department of science on which they bear”.

Dianthus fruticosus from John Sibthorpe and Ferdinand Bauer’s Flora Graeca. London: Taylor, 1806-37.

Dianthus fruticosus from John Sibthorpe and Ferdinand Bauer’s Flora Graeca. London: Taylor, 1806-37.

We have attempted to atone for this oversight in the following centuries, and the Linnean Society now holds perhaps the finest collection of Darwin and Wallace material outside of a major research library. In 2016, the Society was grateful to receive the Darwin/Wallace collection of Quentin Keynes (Darwin’s great-Grandson, and a noted traveller in his own right). The 300 or so books represent a nearly complete bibliography of Darwin and Wallace’s published works, including a number of exceedingly rare first editions and presentation copies. A condition of the original gift, made by Quentin’s relative Randal Keynes, was that the collection see active use in teaching and research, and so the Society is keen to promote its use among scholars and students.

Prunus Americana from Dissertatio de generatione et metamorphosibus insectorum Surinamensium. Hagae Comitum: Petrum Gosse, 1726.

Prunus Americana from Dissertatio de generatione et metamorphosibus insectorum Surinamensium. Hagae Comitum: Petrum Gosse, 1726.

Other treasures in the Society’s library include Linnaeus’s personal copies of his own works (including Systema Naturae and Species Plantarum), many painstakingly annotated by the man himself. We also have an impressive number of prestige works on natural history, including a hand-coloured Sibthorpe and Bauer Flora Graeca; two copies of Maria Sybilla Merian’s Insectorum Surinamensium (one coloured from 1719, one uncoloured from 1726); a very rare complete edition of Edward Lear’s Illustrations of the Family of Psittacidae, or Parrots; Mark Catesby’s 1731 Natural History of Carolina; a number of incunabula (including the fascinating Ortus Sanitatis of 1491, with its eye-catching mythical creatures), among many other rare and early-printed books on natural history, taxonomy, early medicine, and scientific illustration.

The main reading room.

The main reading room.

All the annotated items in Linnaeus’s personal library, plus many other books, manuscripts, and specimens from our collections, have been digitised by the Society, and can be accessed free-of-charge on our dedicated platform Linnean Online. If you would like to visit the Society in person, we are open 10am-5pm, Monday to Friday. Users consulting material in the Library are strongly advised to contact us first, so material can be prepared ahead of your arrival. You can search our library catalogue via this link (and on Library Hub Discover, of course!). Researchers looking for archival material can search our new archives catalogue, here. Visitors are also welcome to join one of our monthly Treasure’s Tours, among myriad other classes, lectures, exhibitions and events. Many of these events are offered to the public for free. Full details of goings-on at the Society can be found on our website.

Will Beharrell
Librarian

Explore the Linnean Society of London Library’s collections on Library Hub Discover:

  • Browse their records here.
  • Find out more about the library, including full contact details and visitor information, on their Discover information page.

All images © The Linnean Society of London, 2020.

Results of a community consultation: recording retention commitments

Back in June last year the Jisc Collection Management Community Advisory Board issued a brief survey, circulated to various mailing lists.  The aim of the consultation was to gauge community appetite for adopting a common approach to recording retention information in bibliographic records.

We received 39 responses, the majority of which were positive about the principle of incorporating retention information in bibliographic records:

Pie chart depicting 94.7% answering Yes to the question

Over 50% of respondents’ institutions were currently incorporating, or planned to incorporate retention information in bibliographic records:

Of those already doing so, the most regularly cited MARC field used was 583.  Of those with plans to do so, several had not yet decided on the field to use.

All respondents agreed that they would be prepared to use a standardised format for recording retention information if recommended/endorsed by the community and/or representative bodies.  Reasons given for responses included:

“standardisation is key to sharable records”

“Standardised format enables data exchange and sharing.”

“We like to adopt agreed metadata standards where they exist”

“If everybody using the same standards then would be easier to interpret what others are doing”

Following the results of the survey, and additional discussions, the CMCAB decided to proceed in working on some recommendations around the use of standardised retention codes during the Autumn.

Watch this space for an update on the results of that work shortly.